Dalton
The Dumfriesshire Companion
Haig Gordon

THEMES & PERSONALITIES

Introduction

Some Historical Background

The Border

From Westerkirk to Westminster Abbey -
Thomas Telford


Robert Burns - Doonhamer

The Sage of Ecclefechan - Thomas Carlyle

Hugh MacDiarmid and the Muckle Toon

Other Literary Figures

The Artists

Fame and Fortune

Other Pairs of Eyes

Dalton
The colourful welcome to Dalton Pottery

Until 1633 there were two parishes hereabouts: Meikle Dalton and Little Dalton.


The ruins of Little Dalton Kirk can be found on the banks of the Dalton Burn to the north-west of the village at the farm of Kirkhill. The building was probably put up in the early 1500s.


In the village, obviously the heart of Meikle Dalton, the present parish kirk was built in the 1890s but the ecclesiastical use of the site goes much further back in time. Within the kirkyard are the ruins of the old parish church completed in 1704, which itself was built upon the foundations of a medieval kirk, some of the latter's walling having been incorporated into its successor.


Dalton's best-known minister was Rev Dr James Cririe (1752-1835). He began his working life as a herdsman but through vigorous self-improvement rose to be the rector of the High School of Edinburgh. Having also been ordained, he came as minister to Dalton in 1800 and spent the rest of his life here. Cririe was a bit of a poet. Apparently Robert Burns liked his 'Address to Loch Lomond' but a contemporary critic judged it to be 'not much better than a book of the roads would be, were it put into verse; and, when the reader arrives at the end, he is almost as fatigued as if he had travelled the journey himself.'


Dalton was the birthplace in 1793 of the physician and poet William Beattie.


Dalton Pottery was started by Geoff and Jenny Finch, who have been making ceramics together since they met at college in 1982. The ceramic medium was ingeniously used for the village's 2000 millennium memorial, which is made up of the hand impressions of 110 children in Dalton and Carrutherstown.


Another kind of memorial can be found at the top of Almagill Hill to the north-west of the village. It commemorates a popular local countryman Joe Graham: 'many years huntsman of the Dumfriesshire Foxhounds, who died in 1898 at the age of 80'. Joe, a former weaver from Cumberland, was with the Dumfriesshire Hunt from its formation in 1848. H e is praised in D J Bell-Irving's sporting memoirs Tally-Ho (1920):

Joe Graham came to Dumfriesshire with a great reputation as a horseman. He was also credited with having, when the need arose, quite his share of expressive language, though one of his maxims was: "Don't swear in the hunting field if you can help it, but if you can't, give it them hot and strong and to the point." He was a great believer in the music of the pack.He always maintained that a musical hound was a loyal hound that wanted the rest of the pack to share in the scent.

PLACES

Ae
Amisfield
Annan
Auldgirth
Bankend
Beattock
Bentpath
Brydekirk
Canonbie
Carronbridge
Carrurtherstown
Chapelknowe
Clarencefield
Closeburn
Collin
Cummertrees
Dalswinton
Dalton
Dornock
Dumfries
Duncow
Dunscore
Durisdeer
Eaglesfield
Eastriggs
Ecclefechan
Eskdalemuir
Glencaple
Gretna
Hightae
Holywood
Johnstonebridge
Kettleholm
Kirkconnel
Kirkpatrick Fleming
Kirkton
Kirtlebridge
Langholm
Lochmaben
Lockerbie
Middlebie
Moffat
Moniaive
Mouswald
Newton Wamphray
Parkgate
Penpont
Powfoot
Ruthwell
Sanquhar
Templand
Thornhill
Tinwald
Torthorwald
Tynron
Wanlockhead
Waterbeck

Acknowledgements     XML Sitemap     HTML Sitemap     ROR Sitemap    
Copyright © Galloway Publishing 2012.    All rights reserved